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black lives matter - august 28
Wellness
Published Monday Aug 24, 2020 by Camille Parmer

The August 28th We Need to Talk About

Mindbody Community
Perspective
Personal Growth

While August 28th is just another day on the calendar for some, it represents a moment of great historical significance shared across generations of Black people in America. The colliding sequence of events that occurred through the years on August 28th may appear coincidental, but that makes them no less noteworthy or important. The date has historically brought both triumph and sadness for the African-American community and has transformed into what should be a day of remembrance not only for Black people, but for us all.


The date has historically brought both triumph and sadness for the African-American community and has transformed into what should be a day of remembrance not only for Black people, but for us all.  
 

It was on this day in 1833 that the United Kingdom abolished slavery, prompting a trickle-like effect across many other countries and eventually the United States. In a horrific fluke of fate, on August 28th, 1955, a Black, fourteen-year-old boy named Emmet Till was murdered during a time of extreme racial tension and injustice in America.  

The date became further destined for continual significance as the nation looked on while Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., delivered his iconic “I Have a Dream” speech on August 28th, 1963. Pivotal to the Civil Rights Act of 1964, King, Jr.’s historic oration still evokes an emotional response, inspiring us to make our country a better place for everyone, united not only in thought and ideas, but in our hearts. 

Over the last two decades, August 28th again marked catastrophic devastation echoed by powerful change. On this day in 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall as a Category 5 hurricane, destroying homes, leveling communities, taking lives, and displacing a significant population of Black people in New Orleans, Louisiana. Black Americans were and remain disproportionately affected by Hurricane Katrina, making up approximately two-thirds of evacuees from the area—their livelihoods, families, and homes literally washed away. 

And yet, in what seemed to some a light at the end of the tunnel, on August 28th, 2008, then-senator Barack Obama accepted the Democratic nomination to become the first Black president of the United States of America. A collective smile came into focus on the faces of young, hopeful Black boys and girls, Black teens roiled by not knowing what to do “when they grow up,” and Black elders who never thought they would witness the day—someone who looked like them was months away from election to the most powerful position in America.


We must acknowledge that the 28th of August represents a pivotal date for Black Americans.


These iconic events remind us of humanity’s resilience, of the power of social and political action, and of the work we need to do as a country to ensure equality for those historically deprived of it.


These iconic events remind us of humanity’s resilience, of the power of social and political action, and of the work we need to do as a country to ensure equality for those historically deprived of it. Mindbody recognizes this day because it impacts not only members of our team but also our customers and consumers. Together, we are on a journey of learning and sharing the stories that have shaped us as a society. Understanding the impact of this day on our past positions us to be better and stronger for whatever challenges our unity next. This year, as we commemorate August 28th, let’s hope that it brings wellness, love, and a unified recognition of the lived experiences of our Black family members, friends, co-workers, and neighbors. 

Camille Parmer
Written by
Camille Parmer
Senior People and Culture Coordinator
About the author
Camille Parmer is Mindbody’s senior people and culture coordinator, working behind the scenes as the HR department liaison to both internal and external partners and stakeholders. Camille is also an active member of Mindbody United and is passionate about equality in the workplace. Before joining Mindbody and completing her Master of Science in human resource management from Troy University, she spent several years working alongside law enforcement as a tactical crime analyst. Outside of the office, Camille enjoys teaching contemporary, ballet, jazz, and tap dance lessons, traveling, and spending time with family and friends.
shanila sattar
Wellness
Published Wednesday Mar 17, 2021 by Shanila Sattar

Foundational Steps to Cultivating a Daily Self-love Practice

Self-care
Expert Advice
Personal Growth
Wellness

When you think of self-love what do you think of? Bubble baths, walks on the beach, facemasks, or what? Self-love can mean so many different things but when we think about self-love, we have to acknowledge loving ourselves both on the outside and on the inside. The way that we show ourselves love is one of the most important things we will ever do. 

How do we treat ourselves? How do we talk to ourselves? What foods are we putting into our bodies? How are we thinking about our overall well-being when practicing self-love?

As self-love defines and redefined itself for you over the years, here are a few foundational tips to think about when easing into your self-love journey.

 

Step 1: Learn to set boundaries

Don’t we love this one? Loving ourselves has a lot to do with the boundaries that we have for ourselves, with others, and for others. Take time to think about your own emotional, mental, physical, and spiritual needs when setting boundaries that reflect your personal needs. Boundaries don’t have to be big and scary; they are here to remind us that you get to have your lived experience and still have expectations about how you’d like to be treated and what you’d like to feel.

When thinking about your boundaries, ask yourself:

  • How do I feel without having boundaries?
  • What would I like to have boundaries around?
  • Are my boundaries actual boundaries or am I creating walls in my life?
  • How do I plan to uphold my boundaries?
Step 2: Cultivate self-compassion

In a world where perfectionism and curated existences have been rewarded, begin to cultivate compassion for yourself. You are a soul having a human experience and it’s totally okay if things are not perfect. 

Mindfulness exercises such as Breathwork, self-care activities, and self-compassion, all help train the mind, emotions, and even the body’s stress chemicals to be able to deal with undesired situations. Self-compassion means, can you be nice to yourself? Can you find empathy and kindness for yourself in the middle of what feels chaotic, stressful, or unwanted? Self-compassion means that we get to make mistakes, have our plans not work out the way that we wanted, and we still get to celebrate that we are doing the best that we can and it is enough.

When thinking about self-compassion, ask yourself:

  • How do I respond to stressful situations?
  • How hard am I on myself?
  • How do I celebrate myself?
  • How do I show myself kindness?
Step 3: Nourish yourself

In every sense of the word “nourishment”, begin to learn what nourishes you and what depletes you. Nourishment doesn’t just mean food for yourself; it means that whatever you are consuming whether it be media, podcasts, people, energy, information, etc. all impact the way that we think, feel, and experience life.

Nourishing yourself definitely goes right along the lines of having your boundaries intact and practicing self-compassion. 

When thinking about nourishment, ask yourself:

  • How do I nourish my emotional well-being?
  • How do I nourish my mental well-being?
  • How do I nourish my physical well-being?
  • How do I nourish my spiritual well-being?
  • How do I nourish my social well-being?
  • How do I nourish my financial well-being?

That’s it. Those are the foundational steps to cultivating a self-love practice that you can ease into your daily routine. Come back to these questions often, because like anything else, self-love is a practice and it takes effort, time, and intention to maintain. 

If you’d like to try breathwork, mindfulness, or play classes with me, check out these workshops and training sessions that work with your schedule. For other breathwork classes, browse Mindbody.

 

About the author
Shanila is a 4th generation sound healer, breathwork coach, mentor, women’s researcher, and speaker. She is the Founder of AlwaysPlayStudios where she trains breathwork facilitators and sound healers. Her background is in tech, having co-founded an award-winning web agency, and in women’s research, specifically in mindsets, implicit bias, perfectionism, women's health, and societal experiences supported through the National Science Foundation, National Institute of Health, and several universities. She has implemented several health and wellbeing programs in underserved populations throughout the US. Shanila mentors healers on their healing and intuitive wellness journeys. Connect: @shanila.sattar